Current UV Index
Adelaide
UV index: 0.0
Alice Springs
UV index: 0.0
Brisbane
UV index: 0.0
Canberra
UV index: 0.0
Darwin
UV index: 0.0
Kingston
UV index: 0.0
Melbourne
UV index: 0.0
Newcastle
UV index: 0.0
Perth
UV index: 0.0
Sydney
UV index: 0.0
Townsville
UV index: 0.0

Click the indexes to view the minimum recommended protection

When the UV index is low, sun protection is generally not needed unless outside for extended periods

UV observations courtesy of ARPANSA
Disclaimer

Fast facts

  • Around 36 Australians are diagnosed with Melanoma every day.
  • Australia has one of the highest rates of Melanoma in the world.
  • Approx one person dies every 5 hours from Melanoma in Australia.
  • An estimated 545 Australian women will die from melanoma THIS YEAR.
  • Tanning beds emit dangerous UV rays, increasing the risk of Melanoma.
  • Severe sunburn during childhood can DOUBLE your risk of Melanoma.
  • Melanoma is one of the most preventable forms of cancer.
  • An estimated 1230 Australian men will die from melanoma THIS YEAR.
  • Melanoma is the cancer most likely to affect 15-39 year olds.
  • Melanoma can arise in normal looking skin, a mole or freckle.
  • Melanoma, if detected/treated early, has a survival rate of nearly 100%.
  • There is no cure for melanoma that has spread throughout the body.

Patient Stories

Ben's Story

My name is Ben Kerslake, on the 19th of November 2014, I underwent a scan for a severe headache. I was immediately admitted to hospital when a golf ball sized tumour in my brain and many other throughout my body were discovered. Following brain surgery to remove the main tumour, I was diagnosed with stage 4 metastatic melanoma and was told to only expect a few months left to live.

I was 32 years old.

Watching my wife break down when this news was delivered and thinking of my two young children, I decided then and there not to accept what I was being told. I was not going to leave my family behind.

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Leigh's Story

I'll never forget that feeling when I learned I had melanoma.

"I'm sorry. It is melanoma. I want you back tomorrow for a wider incision and further tests."

What? Me? Not possible.

Yes, definitely possible. Probable, even, given my beach-babe history, he tells me.

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Claude's Story

Having had more than 16 melanomas removed, Claude knew he was on borrowed time. 16 years later and he's melanoma free.

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Vanessa's Story

Vanessa McPhee is on a mission to save a life by raising awareness of melanoma. She has started her own Facebook page, A Mother's Melanoma, to help raise awareness of melanoma. Vanessa did her first Melanoma March in Adelaide in 2015, and with her team, raised over $1000 for melanoma research.

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Kristen's Story

In 2006 at the age of 22, Kristen was diagnosed with a malignant melanoma.

"Only old photos tell the story now but throughout my life I always had a freckle/mole on my left temple. Now that I look back, when I was younger it was small and light brown nothing to be ‘worried about.’ As I got older, the mole on my temple grew and it got darker and darker. Now I look back, there were signs, small ones but they were there. The fact that the mole was on my face meant I saw it everyday, it was ‘normal,’ it was kind of my trademark."

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Emily's Story

In 2011, 25 year old Emily Clohesy was worried about a mole on her back and went to the doctor to have it checked. It was diagnosed as a stage 3 melanoma. Emily had to have her lymph nodes removed from her groin and now lives with lymphedema.

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Karen's Story

In January 2012 Karen Van Gorp had a mole removed and was told she had 'clear margins'. She had one follow up but was not really aware of her increased risk of further disease.

In February 2013 Karen discovered a lump under her right arm and was diagnosed with stage 3 melanoma. It was at this point that her life was turned upside down. She stopped working but had hope the surgery would remove all of the cancer.

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Meagan's Story

As reported in The Advertiser March 21 2015

A tap on the back at the cricket may well have saved Meagan Snewin's life.

Meagan, who is an avid sports fan was at Adelaide Oval three years ago watching a West Indies Test match with girlfriends when she felt a tap on the back and a male voice said: "Excuse me, I'm a doctor".

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